Shape the Times

On Thursday, September 13, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai celebrated its twenty-first annual White Coat Ceremony welcoming the Class of 2022.  Read more

Reflections on the White Coat

Every year, medical schools nationwide celebrate the incoming class of medical students during the White Coat Ceremony—the official start of their medical careers. Since its inception in the early 90s, the White Coat Ceremony has become a revered tradition that emphasizes the importance of both scientific excellence and compassionate care for patients. 
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Still Waiting for Someone to Pinch Me

The White Coat Ceremony is a rite of passage for beginning medical students that creates a psychological contract for professionalism and empathy in the practice of medicine. Slavena Salve Nissan, MD Candidate 2020, reflects on the ceremony’s impact on her first step towards becoming a doctor.  Read more

The History of “Histories”

Sue Li always knew she was going to be a writer.

“I’ve been sort of writing my whole life,” she says. “Ever since I was a kid, I was always writing short stories in my notebook.”

Growing up as an only child who emigrated from China into the United States at the age of four, she often visited the library and could always be found with her head in a book—transporting herself to new worlds almost daily. Her frequent library visits also instilled in her a desire to have her own book on the shelf one day.  Read more

Superwomen in White Coats

On Wednesday, March 1, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) chapter of the American Medical Women’s Association (AMWA) and SinaiArts co-hosted an event called “Superwomen in White Coats: What Does the Coat Mean to You?” Donning a white coat is an immense privilege. With it comes authority, dignity, and a great sense of responsibility. Read more

From Rio to Med School: A Reflection on Transitioning

My stomach is twisting and my heart is beating rapidly. Feelings of dread and self-doubt overwhelm me.

“We have alignment, attention, GO!” the announcer makes the official starting call. My mind goes blank, and I’m racing toward the finish line 2000 meters away. Under the watchful eye of Cristo Redentor and thousands of spectators and donning my Nigerian uniform, I rowed in the D-final of the Women’s Single Scull event at the Olympic Games.

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