How to Save a Life: Confessions from the Front Line

As is the case with most medical schools, the institution at which I receive my medical education is home to a myriad of student interest groups for nearly every clinical specialty. There’s your standard fare of IMIG, PIG, and SIG (for internal medicine, pediatrics, and surgery respectively), but then there are a few that are a bit more esoteric, such as the Transplant Surgery Interest Group (TSIG). Despite statistically very few members of my class going into this specialty, it bolsters one of the largest student memberships of all groups on campus.  Read more

Inspiring Innovation One High School Student at a Time

As the health care sector continues to face new challenges every day like rapidly rising costs and an increasing prevalence of chronic disease, the need for innovation is becoming exceedingly apparent. Now more than ever, we need people to disrupt the status quo and develop revolutionary innovations aimed at solving some of our most unsolvable problems.  Read more

Still Waiting for Someone to Pinch Me

The White Coat Ceremony is a rite of passage for beginning medical students that creates a psychological contract for professionalism and empathy in the practice of medicine. Slavena Salve Nissan, MD Candidate 2020, reflects on the ceremony’s impact on her first step towards becoming a doctor.  Read more

Commuting Like a Pro—From Brooklyn to East Harlem (And Back Again)

When I tell people that I commute back and forth between East Harlem and where I live in Brooklyn, they’re always surprised as to why I chose not to dorm on campus at Aron Hall. My response is that commuting is what I’m used to. I spent four years commuting to Hunter College and loved being in the city during the day and coming home to my family at night. Of course, commuting can be tough too. Read more

REVAMP: A Novel Approach to Well-being in Medical School

My path to medical school has been guided by one, overwhelming, and unrelenting desire: improve health and well-being in our world. About a year ago, this quest lead me to spend a year at the University of Pennsylvania after graduating from the College of Arts and Sciences in the Master’s of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) program, studying the science of human flourishing. While transitioning to medical school, I researched and explored the vast opportunities for positive psychology to make medicine a more positive, thriving, efficient, and effective practice.

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