Charles Sanky is more than a medical student—he is a musician. He began his musical start at four years old, playing the piano. Since then, he has furthered his interest in music and has learned multiple instruments including the violin, trumpet, and even the euphonium—which he played during the four years he was a member of Columbia University’s Wind Ensemble—among others. 

Charles sees music as an integral part of medicine, and is determined to maintain his dual identities throughout his medical career.  “Music and medicine is interconnected,” Charles says. “It’s really a universal language and it will help me become a better physician because it will serve as a reminder of the need to be sensitive to different styles and voices, and to be an intentional listener.”

Watch Charles’ musical skill in action as he presents a classical piece—with a twist.

 


ABOUT CHARLES

Charles Sanky is a first-year medical student at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) and is a native New Yorker from Valley Stream. Before graduating with a degree in psychology and business management from Columbia University, Charles took a non-traditional approach to medical school through ISMMS’ FlexMed Program. He is interested in learning how performance and music can empower patients and providers. He hopes to practice as a physician and contribute to public health policy.

 

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Every year, medical schools nationwide celebrate the incoming class of medical students during the White Coat Ceremony—the official start of their medical careers. Since its inception in the early 90s, the White Coat Ceremony has become a revered tradition that emphasizes the importance of both scientific excellence and compassionate care for patients. 
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The History of “Histories”

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Vision (1-3): Perception, Self-Awareness, and Fantasy

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Chopin with a Twist

Charles Sanky is more than a medical student—he is a musician. He began his musical start at four years old, playing the piano. Since then, he has furthered his interest in music and has learned multiple instruments including the violin, trumpet, and even the euphonium—which he played during the four years he was a member of Columbia University's Wind Ensemble—among others. 
read more

Haiku

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Totentanz

Totentanz

Outside the wind tears

still-green leaves from their branches

pulling them up and off 

like a corn shucker

ripping husk from kernels.


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We Are Not Throwing Away Our Spot

It started with a simple Facebook post in October 2016.
read more

The History of “Histories”

Sue Li always knew she was going to be a writer. “I’ve been sort of writing my whole life,” she says. “Ever since I was a kid, I was always writing short stories in my notebook.” Growing up as an only child who emigrated from China into the United States at the age of four, she often visited the library and could always be found with her head in a book—transporting herself to new worlds almost daily. Her frequent library visits also instilled in her a desire to have her own book on the shelf one day. 
read more

Chopin with a Twist

Charles Sanky is more than a medical student—he is a musician. He began his musical start at four years old, playing the piano. Since then, he has furthered his interest in music and has learned multiple instruments including the violin, trumpet, and even the euphonium—which he played during the four years he was a member of Columbia University's Wind Ensemble—among others. 
read more

Shape the Times

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read more

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When we invited Dr. Mary T. Bassett, commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, to speak about racism in the health care system at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS), we knew that it would be a powerful conversation.
read more

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