A Place for Narrative Medicine within Ophthalmology

Narrative medicine combines medical practice with humanism and art. One fourth-year medical student has co-founded an online publication that shares medical professionals and students reflections after treating patients who have suffered from opthalmological issues—through creative narratives. 
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Medical Students Advocate to #ProtectOurPatients

Medical students at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) are trained to be informed advocates, activists, and change-makers for their patients and society. A few ISMMS students joined the #ProtectOurPatients movement in Washington, DC to sound a clarion call for change.

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Totentanz

Totentanz

Outside the wind tears

still-green leaves from their branches

pulling them up and off 

like a corn shucker

ripping husk from kernels.

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Learning to Study

Phoebe Prioleau, ISMMS MD/MPH Candidate, Class of 2017, talks about the adjustments she had to make in her study habits when she began medical school.

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Photo Essay: Research in Fukushima, Japan

I spent two months last summer doing research in Fukushima, Japan on a trip supported by the Arnhold Global Health Institute at Mount Sinai and Rotary International. Along with another Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai medical student, I got an up-close look at the physical destruction and ongoing mental health challenges stemming from the March 2011 “triple disaster” (earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear accident). During a radiation and disaster medicine course at the beginning of the summer, we traveled to areas destroyed by the tsunami, visited temporary housing complexes and local health screenings, and learned about the science of radiation monitoring. At the end of the summer, we joined a group of American 9/11 survivors visiting northern Japan to share their stories of trauma and recovery.

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Regrowth in Fukushima: Restoring Order After the Triple Disaster, Part 2

(Continued from Part 1)

In Soma City, too, we saw how the tsunami had flattened the land, destroying whole communities in addition to the city’s infrastructure: the train to the regional capital in the north still wasn’t running, but a bus service was held in its place. The old fish market was now empty, with rows of unused boats bobbing up and down. At the Nagomi Care Clinic, a mental health outreach center established after 3/11, I folded paper cranes with the town’s fishermen who had lost their livelihood due to the radiation and now had little to do.

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